By using our Services in any way, you are agreeing to comply with this Agreement. In addition, when using particular services from our website, you agree to abide by any applicable posted guidelines for all our website services, which may change from time to time. Should you object to any term or condition of this Agreement, any guidelines, or any subsequent modifications thereto or become dissatisfied with our website in any way, your only recourse is to immediately discontinue use of our website. We have the right but are not obligated, to strictly enforce this Agreement through self-help, community moderation, active investigation, litigation and prosecution.

By registering on NationalServiceDog.org you agree to the following:

  • I am at least 18 years of age.
  • I am registering myself. If I am registering for someone else I have their permission to do so.
  • I agree that I will not intentionally or unintentionally violate any applicable local, state, national or international law, including
  • but not limited to the Americans with Disabilities Act and its implementing regulations.
  • I understand that it is against the law to intentionally misrepresent an animal as a Service or Assistance Dog.
  • I or the person being registered has a qualifying disability.
  • The dog being registered is either a fully trained Service or Assistance Dog, or is in the process of being trained to help perform specific tasks related to the owner’s disability. Please note that not all states recognize Service or Assistance Dogs in Training. I understand that it is my responsibility to understand and obey all applicable laws in my area.
  • I understand that Registration is not a substitute for proper training.
  • I understand that aggressive behavior constitutes an immediate forfeiture of Registration.
  • I will do my very best to leave an excellent impression with others with my behavior and that of my Service Dog.
  • I have read, understand and comply with the definition of a Service or Assistance Animal.
  • I have read, understand and comply with the Minimum Training Standards for a Service or Assistance Dog which includes a Public Access Test.

Disclaimer

No Legal Advice

The materials in this website are not legal advice or counsel. The information contained in this website is provided only as general information, which may or may not reflect the most current legal developments. We cannot guarantee that private individuals or governmental entities will agree with any position you may take.

While a person who meets the definition of a “disability” has rights accorded the disabled under applicable federal and state law (including rights relating to accommodating service animals), if you are not legally disabled, you may not be entitled to accommodation rights under relevant laws, and our products may confer no benefit upon you.

Our products neither confer any legal rights on any individual, nor represent or certify that the individual has a disability, has a “service animal” under law, or is entitled to accommodation of his or her animal companion within relevant federal or state laws.  Put another way, our products and materials are neither intended nor claimed to document the existence of a disability, and there is no guarantee that any third party will accord the purchaser any right or courtesy.  You are solely responsible for checking with your own medical provider and legal counsel, as appropriate, and documenting that you have a disability and/or have an animal companion entitled to accommodation under relevant laws.

No Medical Advice; Informational Use Only 

The contents of this website are for informational purposes only and do not render medical, psychological, or psychiatric advice, opinion, diagnosis, prescription, or treatment. This website provides general information. Further, the information provided in or through this website should not be used for diagnosing or treating a health problem or disease. It is not a substitute for professional care. If you have or suspect you may have a medical, psychological, or psychiatric problem, or a disability that requires medical attention, then you should consult your appropriate health care provider. Always consult your licensed health care provider regarding your professional care. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website.

Links

Links on this website are provided only as an informational resource, and it should not be implied that we recommend, endorse or approve of any of the content at the linked sites, nor are we responsible for their availability, accuracy or content. You should review the applicable terms and policies, including privacy and data gathering practices, of any site to which you navigate from our website or relating to any applications you use or install from the site. You agree that we will not be responsible or liable for any loss or damage of any sort incurred as the result of any such dealings.

 

Testimonials and Endorsements; No Guarantees or Claims; Disclaimer of Warranties

We may post testimonials and endorsements on our site regarding customer use of our services and products. We believe these testimonials and endorsements reflect experiences that are representative of what consumers will generally achieve with the advertised product in actual, albeit variable, conditions of use.  However, this does not necessarily imply that any given consumer will experience the exact same or similar results as others who have used similar services and who have subsequently written testimonials and endorsements.  Although results generally should be within the range of results a significant number of consumers can experience, the results experienced by any one individual who has written a testimonial or endorsement is not necessarily what any other particularly consumer should expect to experience.  Another way to state this is that results experienced by any one individual who has written a testimonial or endorsement, is not necessarily what any given consumer should expect to experience.

Further, we make no representations, warranties, claims, or guarantees with respect to any information provided on this website or regarding any of our services or products.  Any review or other statements that could be regarded as a testimonial or endorsement does not constitute a guarantee, warranty, or prediction regarding the outcome of the use of any product, service, or piece of information.

To the fullest extent permissible under applicable law, we disclaim any and all implied warranties and representations, including, without limitation, any warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, title, and non-infringement.

Limitation of Liability for Use of Website

While every attempt has been made to verify the information on this website, neither the owners, distributors, agents, publishers or their affiliates assume any responsibility or liability for any error, inaccuracies, omissions in the same (whether typographical, technical, or otherwise), or related to results from use of these materials.  None of these parties is liable for any direct, incidental, consequential, lost profits, business interruption, indirect, or punitive damages arising out of your access to, or use of, or inability to access or use, this website, regardless of whether we are advised of the possibility of such damages. Any person or entity that relies on any information obtained from the website does so at their own risk. If you are dissatisfied or harmed by anything relating to this site, you may leave this site and this will be your sole and exclusive remedy.

Service dogs are specifically trained to assist people having disabilities undertake different duties. Just like other service animals, their desirable traits consist of a good temperament and health. They play an important role in enabling people with disability to accomplish their day-to-day activities without a problem. Their unique abilities make their role invaluable. However, not all people qualify to have service dogs. This article will explain what qualified disability entails and what is excluded from the definition.

According to NSAR, many disabilities are invisible. For a majority of the people, the disability may show itself occasionally via a number of problems that include a diabetic problem or dizziness. Other individuals’ disability may be evident at all times through conditions such as blindness or deafness. Therefore, the initial step of registering for a service dog is straightforward. It requires you to verify that you are eligible as an individual with some form of disability. However, you do not have to indicate your particular disability; you only need to verify that you qualify.

Returns & Refunds

We will accept returns of unused, undamaged, non-customized producst. We cannot accept returns of personalized products unless there is a manufacturing defect in which case we would be delighted to replace the item for you.

When we do accept a return, we will provide a full refund less a 10% re-stocking fee within 14 business days. Refunds will be issued to the original payment method utilized at the time of purchase.

Return Procedure:

Please email us at support@freemypaws.com with

  1. Your name
  2. Your order number
  3. The items you wish to return and
  4. The reason for the return

Our customer support representative will contact you and provide the necessary information to facilitate your return and refund

Some additional information about service dog registration:

Qualification

When it comes to qualification, ADA gives a broad definition of disability. It does not cap the sort of disability for which a service animal can be utilized. Additionally, great flexibility exists concerning the severity and nature of an individual’s physical or mental issue disability. The quintessence of the law states that if a person has any condition that limits or makes it difficult for him or her to perform a critical life activity that other individuals can perform easily, then such a person is qualified. A formal diagnosis or a doctor’s excuse is not necessary.

 

A Partial List of the Disabilities

The activity may be an issue during certain periods like dizziness that results in balance problems, a seizure, low blood sugar, stress, panic attacks or depression. Some of the physical issues of qualified disabilities include asthma and other breathing problems, blindness as well as partial blindness, deafness, partial deafness, and diabetes. It also includes dizziness that leads to balance problems, epilepsy, general hearing difficulties, mobility issues, neurological problems, paralysis, speech problems, physical weakness, and seizures. This list is subject to other forms of disabilities.

 

Factors Excluded From The Definition of Qualified Disability

Despite the various conditions under the qualified disability definition, there are also exclusions to such definition. To this end, deviant behavior because of sexual, political, religious or conflicts that are mainly between an individual and society are mental disorders except if the conflict or deviance is a symptom of a dysfunction in a person. Title II of the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 notes that present or future explanation of psychological disabilities leaves out common personality traits such as quick temper or poor judgment.Service dogs are specifically trained to assist people having disabilities undertake different duties. Just like other service animals, their desirable traits consist of a good temperament and health. They play an important role in enabling people with disability to accomplish their day-to-day activities without a problem. Their unique abilities make their role invaluable. However, not all people qualify to have service dogs. This article will explain what qualified disability entails and what is excluded from the definition.

 

According to NSAR, many disabilities are invisible. For a majority of the people, the disability may show itself occasionally via a number of problems that include a diabetic problem or dizziness. Other individuals’ disability may be evident at all times through conditions such as blindness or deafness. Therefore, the initial step of registering for a service dog is straightforward.

 

It requires you to verify that you are eligible as an individual with some form of disability. However, you do not have to indicate your particular disability; you only need to verify that you qualify.

 

Qualification

When it comes to qualification, ADA gives a broad definition of disability. It does not cap the sort of disability for which a service animal can be utilized. Additionally, great flexibility exists concerning the severity and nature of an individual’s physical or mental issue disability. The quintessence of the law states that if a person has any condition that limits or makes it difficult for him or her to perform a critical life activity that other individuals can perform easily, then such a person is qualified. A formal diagnosis or a doctor’s excuse is not necessary.

 

A Partial List of the Disabilities

The activity may be an issue during certain periods like dizziness that results in balance problems, a seizure, low blood sugar, stress, panic attacks or depression. Some of the physical issues of qualified disabilities include asthma and other breathing problems, blindness as well as partial blindness, deafness, partial deafness, and diabetes. It also includes dizziness that leads to balance problems, epilepsy, general hearing difficulties, mobility issues, neurological problems, paralysis, speech problems, physical weakness, and seizures. This list is subject to other forms of disabilities.

 

Factors Excluded From The Definition of Qualified Disability

Despite the various conditions under the qualified disability definition, there are also exclusions to such definition. To this end, deviant behavior because of sexual, political, religious or conflicts that are mainly between an individual and society are mental disorders except if the conflict or deviance is a symptom of a dysfunction in a person. Title II of the American with Disabilities Act of 1990 notes that present or future explanation of psychological disabilities leaves out common personality traits such as quick temper or poor judgment.Service dogs are specifically trained to assist people having disabilities undertake different duties. Just like other service animals, their desirable traits consist of a good temperament and health. They play an important role in enabling people with disability to accomplish their day-to-day activities without a problem. Their unique abilities make their role invaluable. However, not all people qualify to have service dogs. This article will explain what qualified disability entails and what is excluded from the definition.

 

According to NSAR, many disabilities are invisible. For a majority of the people, the disability may show itself occasionally via a number of problems that include a diabetic problem or dizziness. Other individuals’ disability may be evident at all times through conditions such as blindness or deafness. Therefore, the initial step of registering for a service dog is straightforward.

 

It requires you to verify that you are eligible as an individual with some form of disability. However, you do not have to indicate your particular disability; you only need to verify that you qualify.